Across every sector and every segment – from FMCG (fast moving consumer goods) to luxury brands – manufacturers are exploring the ever-increasing, technology-driven possibilities of customisation in the products they make. Uniqueness and difference is becoming the standard and this includes the surfaces we walk on.

A building’s floor is one of the most fundamental of spatial elements that serves to underpin one’s perception and experience of an interior architectural space. Here are some of the recent custom flooring projects that have grabbed our attention:

Strikingly geometric and strongly chromatic floors
In Stockholm, Greco Architects used Bolon’s “Bolon by You” customisation service to create a strikingly geometric and strongly chromatic flooring concept for film-production company Svensk Filmindustri. The triangular tiles are featured in red, blue, orange and grey tones.

The bright carpet tiles were placed throughout the office, which eliminated the hierarchy between private and public spaces within the building. The film company is committed to environmental sustainability and the pollutant-free, recyclable and easily cleaned carpeting helps them to achieve this goal.

Triangular carpet tiles featured in red, blue, orange and grey tones, eliminate the hierarchy between private and public spaces in the office.

Expressive oak flooring at London’s Design Museum
Architectural grandee John Pawson specified the size, the grain and the finish of the new landmark Design Museum’s expressive oak flooring from Dinesen. The institution, which recently tripled in size to 10 000 square metres, is situated on Kensington high street and is housed within a landmark listed building that dates back to the 1960s.

During the complex renovation, OMA, Allies and Morrison, Arup and John Pawson collaborated to bring the building back to use. The previous façade was replaced with a double-glazed skin and the original concrete floors were removed. An oak-lined atrium articulates a series of atmospheric, calm spaces. Italian terrazzo flooring was used throughout the basement and ground floors, and these areas transition into warm-toned oak flooring and wall panels that were customised for this project.

The size, grain and finish of the new landmark Design Museum’s expressive oak flooring was specified by the architect. 2 700m² of Dinesen Oak planks add to the architectural experience of the dramatic, yet elegant building. The straight lines and angles are a continuous theme in the building and wooden floors enhance this design element. Photo credit: Image by James Florio

A fit-for-purpose recording studio
When it came to fitting out the recording studio of Royal Opera House in Stockholm (also the National Opera of Sweden), the client responded to Kymo’s slogan to “Go on and create” by using the manufacturer’s individualisation service, “The Atelier”.

Kymo developed a customised, hand-made, thick-pile carpet with superior acoustic qualities, swallowing sound rather than allowing unwanted noise to reverberate.

Converting the Benedictine Abbey into a hotel and conference centre
Last year, the Benedictine Abbey in Sieburg, Germany, was converted into a hotel and conference centre by MSM Meyer Schmitz-Morkramer. The architects needed a customised solution for the project’s floor space, given the historic importance of the building, so a unique carpet hue called Michaelsberg Beige was created by Carpet Concept. The natural stone, wood and specially commissioned carpet all speak the same chromatic language at the new facility.

A specially commissioned carpet hue was created to speak the same chromatic language as the stone and wood of the Benedictine Abbey in Sieburg.

Custom tiling at Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis
Mosa’s custom-designed flooring was used for the new Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis hospital in Delft, Netherlands. EGM architecten wanted to translate a pixellated image of Vemeer’s iconic painting “Girl with a Pearl Earring” into an abstract-expressive floorscape, so to meet this need, Mosa created a variety of custom-sized and -shaped elements for the unique, expansive project.

EGM architecten translated a pixelated image of a famous painting onto the floorscape of the Reinier de Graaf Gasthuis in Delft.

Thanks and acknowledgement are given to www.bolon.com, www.genelec.com and www.architonic.com for some of the information contained in this article.

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