Lessons learnt and wisdom gained in 2017 gave architects the tools to predict trends for the new year. The editors at ArchDaily’s Spanish arm, Plataforma Arquitectura have highlighted the following trends in architecture for 2018:

1. The harmony of bamboo

Bamboo has been around many years and this multifaceted material extends to everything from flooring and walling to furniture and décor. Recently bamboo has begun to be associated with poverty in construction. Bamboo is a trend not only because it is an essential material, but because also has a strong reputation and enormous potential.

It is important for us to learn from bamboo artisans, who use bamboo with instinctiveness and fluidity that contrasts the complex construction process of other materials. We will be better architects when we are able to become fascinated with the harmony of bamboo and produce beautiful things.

2. Creating an historic dialogue with digital tools

Digital tools have come to dominate architectural representation and through technology we are able to create increasingly realistic images of spaces that have yet to be built. Many architects are advocating to preserve the intimate relationship between art and architecture in the representative stage of design that was consolidated centuries ago.

Historical art references and collages characteristic of the sixties and seventies are being adopted by architectural firms. The fusion achieved with the new digital tools results in a more artistic dialogue about the intentions and references of some of the current architecture firms.

3. Women in architecture

A large number of movements have emerged in recent years that demand better working conditions for women and the end of gender inequality. Marches across the globe and widespread social campaigns such as #HeForShe and #MeToo last year made it explicit that women do not earn the same as men. They suffer discrimination and harassment at work, they work longer hours and are more susceptible to being fired for being mothers.

In architecture, a series of columns and events emerged that proposed talking about the issue as well as empowering women in the world of architecture. Instead of statements and speeches, 2018 will see more concrete action. The 2018 Venice Biennial of Architecture will be directed by two women architects; Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara, and the list of curators in charge of the national pavilions already has a much higher female participation than in previous years.

4. Understanding how millennials occupy space

Millennials experience things in a very different way compared to previous generations. Many millennials share housing with friends, are less interested in marriage, and simply decide that they will not have children.

Millennials have an autonomous spirit and this generation is projected to become their own bosses, which is why they encourage the use of the same space for more than one activity. Millennials therefore need spaces that are highly flexible and 2018 will be the year to address the needs of this growing trend.

Full thanks and acknowledgement are given to www.archdaily.com for some of the information contained in this article.

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