Musa Shangase has been appointed as Corobrik’s new marketing director.


Appointed as Corobrik’s new marketing director, Musa Shangase has taken over the reins from stalwart Peter Kidger, who retired after 43 years at the company.

Although these are big shoes to fill, Shangase is up for the challenge and is embracing this opportunity to promote the use of conventional building materials in paving and walling projects.

Shangase is adamant that every South African deserves a home – not just a tin or cardboard shanty unable to weather the storms, but the soundness of bricks and mortar that can symbolise the dignity of a nation and the essence of the soul.

After joining Corobrik in July 2013 as national commercial manager and in November 2013 was appointed to the Board of Corobrik as Commercial Director, Shangase has grown the company’s market share of public sector contracts, influencing key government decision-makers in using clay and concrete masonry as their preferred building materials. His new role will also incorporate the commercial and marketing director functions.

Having previously held several senior management positions, such as managing director at African Brick, Shangase has considerable experience in the building and construction industry. He is currently also the deputy president of the Clay Brick Association of Southern Africa.

Looking ahead, he believes his new role can grow the economy and create employment. By encouraging the government to use face brick and pavers as its preferred building material, the effects of those constructions would impact in societies demanding the greatest economic attention.

“Building in rural areas also provides opportunities to transfer skills by training local residents in bricklaying, masonry, electrical work and boiler-making. The reality is that the country’s economic growth depends on boosting employment and contributions from small, medium and micro-enterprise businesses and projects, where skills transfer is a natural spin-off and a critical means for achieving this objective,” Shangase says.

He would like to see the government, especially when it comes to affordable and low-cost housing, schools, clinics and other public buildings, using more quality products.
“Replacing bad-quality houses and shacks with good-quality brick homes means the health, education and employment prospects of disadvantaged people can be significantly improved. This affects the economy and the future of this country,” he says.
“As a market leader, it is our responsibility to help provide the social infrastructure – from schools to libraries and community centres – to build a better tomorrow,” Shangase states.
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