It is imperative to abide by a vinyl flooring manufacturer’s guidelines because different types of vinyl flooring will exhibit different degrees of tolerance to moisture.

Commercial projects continue to demand higher, more advanced flooring specifications and the solutions that manufacturers are able to offer are continually evolving to meet these needs. Mature and sophisticated design markets have led to the development of  tightly regulated work procedures as well as the commitment from all key stakeholders in the system to adhere to codes of practice, thereby minimising the risk of flooring failures. In South Africa, however, we often have limited skills and resources that need to try and achieve first-world results.

The two types of screed moisture that impact the moisture levels are residual moisture and moisture that is derived from groundwater and hydrostatic forces. The second type is very difficult to measure or evaluate in relation to any specific project.

Concrete and cement-based components of a building need time to dry and cure. This is particularly true of the slabs and screeds onto which we are installing vinyl flooring. As a rule of thumb, every 25mm thickness of concrete or screed takes a month to become dry enough to install a vinyl floorcovering. This means that a 150mm slab, with a 50mm screed topping, will need eight months to dry sufficiently.

It is imperative to abide by a vinyl flooring manufacturer’s guidelines because different types of vinyl flooring will exhibit different degrees of tolerance to moisture. Adhering to the manufacturer’s guidelines ensures that you and your client are able to achieve the outcome that you set out to achieve with your vinyl flooring installation.